<div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Nov 26, 2012 at 9:15 AM, Robert Casties <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:casties@mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de" target="_blank">casties@mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">On 26.11.12 17:57, Robert Casties wrote:<br>
>> In terms of practical examples, Open Annotation has a wiki that's sort of<br>
>> buried over at the W3C site. In this example, both Well-Known-Text and SVG<br>
>> are used to select part of a map. It might give us some inspiration:<br>
>> <a href="http://maphub.github.com/api/#comment_example" target="_blank">http://maphub.github.com/api/#comment_example</a><br>
><br>
> Interesting examples. They seem to be afraid to show their full SVG :-)<br>
<br>
</div>I take that back, it is complete  :-) (But XML inside RDF, argh. and the<br>
units...)<br></blockquote><div class="h5"><br>I would encourage you to ignore the RDF. In this thread, we've already been talking about a pseudo-SVG-projected-into-JSON field so it's not like we're in a position to judge. ;)<br>
<br>OA stays "pure", in a sense, by making heavy use of standards, but we shouldn't feel bound to their serialization of anything when we know that developers are using JSON over the wire. Principle of least surprise suggests we should stick near these vocabularies wherever possible as long as it doesn't cause a total "WTF" when viewed through the JSON lens.<br>
</div></div></div>